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  1. page chapter11 edited ... Remember! All the forces discussed are attractive in nature. HOWEVER, molecules also exert rep…
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    Remember! All the forces discussed are attractive in nature. HOWEVER, molecules also exert repulsive forces on one another. Electrons of one molecule will repel electrons of another and the same thing will happen between the nuclei. The magnitude of these forces rise as the distance between molecules in liquids and solids decrease. This explains why condensed states are harder to condense FURTHER. They are already in close contact and will resist further compression.
    11.3 Properties of Liquids
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    the elastic force force in
    Let's look at...TRENDS! Liquids with strong intermolecular forces will have high surface tensions.
    CAN YOU FIGURE THIS ONE OUT- Water has a greater surface tension that most other liquids. WHY?
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    6:46 am
  2. page chapter11 edited Chapter 11 Intermolcular Intermolecular Forces (Liquids and Solids) Topics: Topics 11.1. …
    Chapter 11 IntermolcularIntermolecular Forces (Liquids and Solids)
    Topics:

    Topics

    11.1. The Kinetic Molecular Theory and Liquids and Solids {http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb-media/70/2370-004-AFDB2603.gif} cited from media-2.web.britannica.com
    11.2. Intermolecular Forces
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    11.9. Phase Changes
    Introduction
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    many basic priniciplesprinciples of matter,
    11.1 The Kinetic Molecular Theory of Liquids and Solids
    A Brief Overview of Gases
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    {http://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/liquids/ions.gif} Ion-Dipole Forces: The larger the charge and size of the ion and the larger the magnitude of the dipole moment and size of the molecule, the greater the strength of the interaction!
    Dipole induced dipole and ion-induced dipole interactions:
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    molecule. The attrractiveattractive interaction between
    Polarizability is the ease with which the electron distribution in an atom or molecule can be distorted. The greater the number of electrons and more diffuse the electron cloud in the atom, the greater its polarizability. A diffuse cloud is an electron cloud that is spread over an appreciable volume, so that the electrons are not held tightly by the nucleus. Polarizabiltity allows gases containing atoms or nonpolar molecules (like Helium) to condense.
    Instantaneous Dipole: Let's use Helium, a nonpolar molecule, atom as an example for this particular term. The electrons are constantly moving at some distance from the nucleus. It is very possible that, due to the configuration of the electrons, the atom has a dipole moment known as an instantaneous dipole because it lasts only for a fraction of a second. In the next second, it may have a new instantaneous dipole in a different location. However, because all these instantaneous dipoles cancel each other out the atom has no dipole moment. In a collection of atoms, like Helium, an instantaneous dipole of one Helium molecule can induce a dipole in the neighboring Helium atoms and than the next second, create a different instantaneous dipole in a different Helium atom. This type of interaction creates dispersion forces, which are attractive forces that arise as a result of temporary dipoles induced in atoms or molecules. At very low temperatures, when atomic speeds are reduced, dispersion forces are strong enough to hold some atoms, like gaseous Helium, together, causing the gas to condense!
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    6:42 am
  3. page chapter11 edited ... This lab was adapted from: http://www.csd509j.net/cvhs/kirscha/Intermolecular%20Forces%20Lab.…
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    This lab was adapted from:
    http://www.csd509j.net/cvhs/kirscha/Intermolecular%20Forces%20Lab.doc
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    taken from EigthEighth Edition Chemistry
    All jokes were from Garrett Gallinot!
    Closest Image and many other images were revised on paint
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    6:36 am
  4. page chapter11 edited ... Questions: 1. From your observations, list the compounds observed in order from strongest int…
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    Questions:
    1. From your observations, list the compounds observed in order from strongest intermolecular force, to weakest.
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    think would bilboil the easiest
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    why?
    3. What, if any, errors,What errors could have
    This lab was adapted from:
    http://www.csd509j.net/cvhs/kirscha/Intermolecular%20Forces%20Lab.doc
    (view changes)
    6:36 am

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